Department of Biochemistry

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Primary Faculty

Noah Dephoure
  • Assistant Professor of Biochemistry
  • Proteomics Core Director
Phone:
(646) 962-6232
Bio:
The Dephoure laboratory uses quantitative proteomics to globally monitor protein composition, abundance and post-translational modifications. The lab is trying to understand how signaling events such as phosphorylation regulate protein dynamics. The lab is also developing methods for identifying phosphorylation dependent changes in protein complex composition and protein subcellular localization. The hope is to leverage these methods to identify functional phosphorylation sites that impact cellular physiology and human disease.
Jeremy Dittman, M.D., Ph.D.
  • Associate Professor of Biochemistry
Phone:
(212) 746-5224
Bio:
The Dittman laboratory is interested in synaptic function at the molecular and circuit levels.  The lab is currently focused on three lines of research: spatial and temporal dynamics of synaptic proteins, the mechanisms underlying synaptic vesicle fusion and its modulation, and the impact of axonal ER on synapse function, axon integrity, and neurodegeneration.
David Eliezer, Ph.D.
  • Professor of Biochemistry
Phone:
(212) 746-6557
Bio:
The Eliezer laboratory is primarily involved with the application of NMR spectroscopy to problems in non-native structural biology. This includes characterizing the location and extent of structure in and the intermolecular interactions of aggregation-competent partially unfolded states of proteins involved in neurodegenerative disease. Specific targets include Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease related proteins.
Dr. Mingming Hao
  • Assistant Professor of Biochemistry
Phone:
(646) 962-9817
Bio:
The Hao laboratory aims to understand why type 2 diabetes occurs and how it can be prevented. The lab focuses on the pancreatic beta-cells, which are the only cells that make and release insulin in response to an increase in glucose levels.  Pancreatic islet dysfunction leading to insufficient glucose-stimulated insulin secretion triggers the clinical onset of diabetes. The lab also uses in vitro and in vivo systems to study the molecular mechanisms and pathophysiology of beta-cell dysfunction during type 2 diabetes development.
Joshua Levitz, Ph.D.
  • Assistant Professor of Biochemistry
Phone:
(212) 746-3432
Bio:
The Levitz laboratory uses a variety of optical techniques to improve our understanding of synaptic signaling molecules with a focus on neurotransmitter-gated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The lab is particularly interested in probing GPCRs at the molecular, synaptic, and circuit levels to gain a more coherent and mechanistic view of their roles in physiology and neuropsychiatric disease.
Frederick Maxfield, Ph.D.
  • Professor & Chairman Biochemistry
  • Interim Chair, Cell & Developmental Biology
Phone:
(646) 962-2759
Bio:
The Maxfield laboratory studies basic cell biology of membrane traffic and its application to understanding and treating diseases. Current interests include cholesterol transport, control of lysosomal pH and extracellular degradation of large objects (e.g., amyloid, dead adipocytes, or deposits of lipoproteins) by macrophages. These studies are related to atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease and a rare lysosomal storage disease (Niemann-Pick C disease).
Timothy McGraw, Ph.D.
  • Professor of Biochemistry
Phone:
(212) 746-4982
Bio:
The McGraw laboratory uses quantitative optical microscopy to study insulin-regulated membrane trafficking. The main objectives of lab work are to characterize the GLUT4 trafficking pathway in the presence and absence of insulin, and to identify how the insulin-signal transduction regulates the movement of GLUT4 vesicles. In addition to studies of GLUT4 trafficking, we are also interested in more basic questions of membrane trafficking, specifically a more detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms of clathrin-mediated internalization from the cell surface and the mechanisms for return of endocytosed proteins back to the plasma membrane.
Anant Menon, Ph.D.
  • Professor of Biochemistry
Phone:
(646) 962-2476
Bio:
The Menon laboratory is interested in fundamental aspects of cellular membrane biogenesis. Lab work covers a number of areas concerned with lipid biosynthesis, propagation of the phospholipid bilayer of biological membranes, translocation (flip-flop) of lipids across bilayers, and intracellular lipid transport. The lab approaches these problems through biochemical, biophysical, genetic and chemical methods.
Timothy Ryan, Ph.D.
  • Professor of Biochemistry
  • Professor of Biochemistry in Anesthesiology
Phone:
(212) 746-6403
Bio:
The Ryan laboratory develops and applies quantitative methods to understand the molecular underpinnings of synapse function with a particular emphasis on the control of neurotransmitter release and the recycling of synaptic vesicles. The lab discovered that nerve terminals represent one of the critical loci of metabolic vulnerability in the brain which has led them to explore questions of how fuel availability and combustion is regulated to support synapse function.
David J. Simon, Ph.D.
  • Assistant Professor of Biochemistry
Bio:
The Simon laboratory studies how individual neurons, unlike almost all other cell types in the body, survive for a lifetime. The lab asks how insults such as genetic mutation, injury or inflammation disrupt these survival programs to promote neurodegeneration. The lab also employs a range of molecular and biochemical techniques with the ultimate goals of understanding the molecular basis of neurodegeneration and identifying novel therapeutic targets.

Weill Cornell Medicine Department of Biochemistry 1300 York Avenue,
Box #63 Room A-108
New York, NY 10065 Phone: (646) 962-2759